PrintThe United States Through Industrialism
Table of Contents
Unit 1: Our Colonial Heritage
1. The First Americans
How did the first Americans adapt to their environments?
 
Activity: Social Studies Skill Builder. Students hypothesize the geographic origins of American Indian artifacts to explore how the first Americans in eight cultural regions adapted to their environments.
 
Reading Further: Digging Up the Past
2. European Exploration and Settlement
How did Europeans explore and establish settlements in the Americas?
 
Activity: Visual Discovery. Students analyze and bring to life images depicting European exploration and settlement to discover how European nations explored and established settlements in the Americas.
 
Reading Further: Who Was the Real Columbus?
3. The English Colonies in North America
What were the similarities and differences among the colonies in North America?
 
Activity: Problem Solving Groupwork. Students analyze the similarities and differences among the English colonies in North America by creating and visiting sales booths in a “colonial fair.”
 
Reading Further: A Colonial Cast of Characters
4. Life in the Colonies
What was life really like in the colonies?
 
Activity: Social Studies Skill Builder. Students analyze primary and secondary source material to explore eight aspects of life in the American colonies, including rights of colonists, religion, education, and life for enslaved African Americans.
 
Reading Further: A Great Awakening
Unit 2: Revolution in the Colonies
5. Toward Independence
When is it necessary for citizens to rebel against their government?
 
Activity: Response Group. Students participate in a series of colonial town meetings to debate whether to rebel against British rule. In the process, they evaluate the events that deeply divided the American colonists and eventually caused them to rebel against the British government.
 
Reading Further: “I Love the Story of Paul Revere, Whether He Rode or Not”
6. The Declaration of Independence
What principles of government are expressed in the Declaration of Independence?
 
Activity: Writing for Understanding. Students learn about key events leading up to the writing of the Declaration of Independence and, in a Writing for Understanding activity, analyze key excerpts of the Declaration and the principles of government they express.

Reading Further: The Power of Common Sense

7. The American Revolution

How was the Continental army able to win the war for independence from Great Britain?

Activity: Experiential Exercise. Students participate in a game of Capture the Flag. They compare their experience to the determining factors of the war for independence from Great Britain--examining the strengths and weaknesses of each side, important battles, and other key factors in the conflict--to determine how the British were defeated.

Reading Further: George Washington: A Warrior Spirit and a Caring Heart

Unit 3: Forming a New Nation
8. Creating the Constitution
What compromises emerged from the Constitutional Convention?
 
Activity: Experiential Exercise. Students examine the factors that led to the creation of a stronger central government under the U.S. Constitution by re-creating a key debate from the Constitutional Convention.

Reading Further: The Long, Hot Summer of 1787

9. The Constitution: A More Perfect Union
How has the Constitution created “a more perfect Union”?
 
Activity: Social Studies Skill Builder. Students explore the key features and guiding principles of the U.S. Constitution by assuming the role of law students taking a final exam on the Constitution.
 
Reading Further: Who Are “We the People”?
10. The Bill of Rights
What freedoms does the Bill of Rights protect and why are they important?
 
Activity: Response Group. Students learn about the important rights and freedoms protected by the Bill of Rights by analyzing a series of scenarios to determine whether the Bill of Rights protects certain actions taken by citizens.
 
Reading Further: What Is Religious Freedom?
Unit 4: Launching the New Republic
11. Political Developments in the Early Republic
How did the Federalist and Republican visions for the United States differ?
 
Activity: Experiential Exercise. Students compare Federalist and Republican visions for the United States by taking on the roles of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson to debate the main issues that divided the two groups.

Reading Further: The President’s House

12. Foreign Affairs in the Young Nation
To what extent should the United States have become involved in world affairs in the early 1800s?
 
Activity: Response Group. Students assume the roles of foreign policy advisers to early presidents to evaluate the extent to which the country should have become involved in world affairs.
 
Reading Further: Tecumseh, the Shooting Star
13. A Growing Sense of Nationhood
What did it mean to be an American in the early 1800s?
 
Activity: Writing for Understanding. Students visit an art exhibit, cotillion, and literary gathering to experience American culture in the early 1800s. They then create a chapter of a book describing what it meant to be an American in this period.

Reading Further: A New Literature Celebrates a New Nation

14. Andrew Jackson and the Growth of American Democracy
How well did President Andrew Jackson promote democracy?
 
Activity: Visual Discovery. Students analyze and bring to life images of key events in the presidency of Andrew Jackson to evaluate how well he promoted democracy.
 
Reading Further: The Trail Where They Cried
Unit 5: An Expanding Nation
15. Manifest Destiny and the Growing Nation
How justifiable was U.S. expansion in the 1800s?
 
Activity: Response Group. Students re-create each territorial acquisition of the 1800s and then evaluate whether the nation’s actions were justifiable.
 
Reading Further: Westward on the Santa Fe Trail
16. Life in the West
What were the motives, hardships, and legacies of the groups that moved west in the 1800s?
 
Activity: Problem Solving Groupwork. Students create and perform minidramas about eight groups of people who moved to the West in the 1800s to explore these people’s motives for moving, the hardships they faced, and the legacies they left behind for future generations.

Reading Further: Gold Rush Pioneers

17. Mexicano Contributions to the Southwest
How have Mexicano contributions influenced life in the United States?
 
Activity: Social Studies Skill Builder. Students examine important Mexicano contributions and determine how they have influenced life in the United States.
 
Reading Further: Mexicano Culture Today
Unit 6: Americans in the Mid-1800s
18. An Era of Reform
To what extent did the reform movements of the mid-1800s improve life for Americans?
 
Activity: Response Group. Students examine the reform movements of the mid-1800s to evaluate to what extent they improved life for Americans. In a Response Group activity, they debate the extent to which grievances from the Declaration of Sentiments have been redressed today.
 
Reading Further: Brook Farm and the Utopian Dream
19. The Worlds of North and South
How was life in the North different from life in the South?
 
Activity: Visual Discovery. Students analyze and bring to life images from the mid-1800s to compare the different ways of life in the North and the South.
 
Reading Further: From Farms to Factories
20. African Americans in the Mid-1800s
How did African Americans face slavery and discrimination in the mid-1800s?
 
Activity: Writing for Understanding. Students analyze quotations and examine images to discover how African Americans faced slavery and discrimination in the mid-1800s. They then create a journal describing some of the experiences of a slave in the period.
 
Reading Further: Harriet Tubman, Moses of the Underground Railroad
Unit 7: The Union Challenged
21. A Dividing Nation
Which events of the mid-1800s kept the nation together and which events pulled it apart?
 
Activity: Visual Discovery. Students analyze and bring to life images depicting the growing conflict between the North and the South to understand why the nation could not prevent civil war.

Reading Further: Tensions Mount in Boston

22. The Civil War
What factors and events influenced the outcome of the Civil War?
 
Activity: Experiential Exercise. Students take on the role of soldiers at the Battle of Gettysburg and encounter key aspects of what it was like to be a soldier in the Civil War and then write about their experiences.
 
Reading Further: Divided House, Divided Families
23. The Reconstruction Era
To what extent did Reconstruction bring African Americans closer to full citizenship?
 
Activity: Visual Discovery. Students analyze primary source images to evaluate how close African Americans came to full citizenship during Reconstruction.
 
Reading Further: The Long Road to Equal Rights
Unit 8: Migration and Industry
24. Tensions in the West
How did settlers change the West and affect American Indians?
 
Activity: Problem Solving Groupwork. Students create a music video to illustrate how western settlement impacted the Nez Percé. They then examine how settlers changed the West and impacted other American Indian groups.
 
Reading Further: Black Exodus
25. The Rise of Industry
Did the benefits of industrialization outweigh the costs?
 
Activity: Experiential Exercise. Students take on the role of workers on an assembly line to experience the costs and benefits of industrialization.

Reading Further: The Celebrity Inventor

26. The Great Wave of Immigration
What was life like for immigrants in the early 1900s?
 
Activity: Writing for Understanding. Students create scrapbooks illustrating what life was like for immigrants in the early 1900s.
 
Reading Further: Young Immigrants Today
Unit 9: A Modern Nation Emerges
27. The Progressive Era
Did the progressives improve life in the United States?
 
Activity: Response Group. Students take on the roles of Progressive era leaders in a panel discussion to evaluate whether progressives improved life in the United States.
 
Reading Further: Kids at Work
28. The United States Becomes a World Power
Should U.S. actions in world affairs around the turn of the 20th century be praised or condemned?
 
Activity: Social Studies Skill Builder. Pairs analyze political cartoons about U.S. actions in world affairs around the turn of the 20th century and evaluate the differing viewpoints of those actions.
 
Reading Further: William Randolph Hearst and the Splendid Little War
29. Linking Past to Present
What changes since 1914 have shaped how we live today?
 
Activity: Social Studies Skill Builder. Students discover important events of the last century and learn how they have affected society in the United States.
 
Reading Further: Water Fights